Lead Paint Removal

Lead Paint Removal

Lead-based paint was used extensively for interior and exterior building surfaces, toys and furniture from the 1940s to the late 1970s. Lead-based paint was banned in 1978 by the Consumer Product Safety Commission. Unfortunately, some countries today still ship products containing lead paint to the U.S.

About 38 million homes, 40% of the nation’s housing, contain lead-based paint, making it a serious but invisible hazard. Rules apply to all renovations, including paint removal, demolition, window replacement, and HVAC ductwork repairs. Remember, any contractor you hire must be certified to perform renovations in older buildings which include lead-based paint.

Buildings containing deteriorating lead-based paint are a health hazard, especially to children under five. When lead-based paint on surfaces is sanded or scraped, it breaks into tiny, sometimes invisible dust that can settle on floors, walls and furniture, where children may swallow or inhale it. Individuals can also ingest dust and soil contaminated with lead from paint that flakes or chalks as it ages.

What We Do

  • Testing by independent certified inspector
  • Notify appropriate regulatory agency
  • Proper containment and removal of identified lead painted materials
  • Thorough site decontamination
  • Proper disposal to certified landfill
  • Final inspection by independent certified inspector
Questions? Call Us!
TOLL FREE
(844) 583-3278

Lead Paint in the U.S.

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Lead-based paint was used extensively in the U.S. from the 1940s until being banned in 1978 by the Consumer Product Safety Commission. Some countries today still ship products containing lead paint to the U.S.

MONDAY - FRIDAY

7:00 am - 5:00 pm

SERVICE AREA
FROM SD TO LA